set


set
set vb 1 Set, settle, fix, establish mean to cause someone or something to be put securely in position.
Set is the most inclusive of these terms, sometimes implying placing in a definite location, especially to serve some definite purpose
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set a light at each window

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set out trees

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set food on the table

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or to permanently fill some void
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set a diamond in a ring

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or establish some limit
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set a limit to discussion

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the law of God determines the laws of this world and sets the bounds and the character of the institutions and activities of men— Donald Harrington

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the question of whether human nature is set by heredity or can be changed by environmental factors— Bauery and sometimes implying a placing under orders (as in an occupation, a situation, an office, or a sphere of life) or under conditions where something or someone must perform an allotted or prescribed function}}

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set a boy to work

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set the maids to cleaning house

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set proctors to watch the students

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or occasionally suggesting a prescribing or ordaining of an object or objects on which one or one's efforts, mind, heart, or eyes concentrates
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set the subject for a debate

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set a goal for his efforts

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set his heart on winning a prize

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set duty before pleasure

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Settle comes close to set but carries a much stronger implication of putting a person or thing in a place or condition of stability, rest, or repose and often a weaker implication of regulative or dictatorial power
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settle an invalid in an easy chair

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settle themselves in their new home

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offered to escort her to Paris and see her settled in a reasonably cheap hotel— Wouk

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the tendency to settle standards on the level of the "common man"—Edmund Wilson

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Often the word carries an implication of decisive quieting, calming, or ordering of something that is disturbed, upset, unstable, or fluctuating
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settle a person's stomach

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settle his doubts

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the white of an egg will settle the coffee

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Everything's settled now. You need not worry, Reuben; there will be no fuss— Gibbons

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there's nothing will settle me but a bullet— Swift

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Fix (see also ADJUST 1; FASTEN) usually implies more stability and permanence in position, condition, or character than set or even settle
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his resolution was already fixedBuchan

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truth which the scientist strives to catch and fixLowes

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his place in the McCoy household had become fixedAnderson

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what I have most at heart is, that some method should be thought of for ascertaining and fixing our language forever— Swift

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the undifferentiated, inchoate religious sense is thus intensified and fixed, to the great and lasting injury of the spiritual life— Inge

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Establish (see also FOUND) stresses not so much the putting in place or the bringing into existence as the becoming fixed, stable, or immovable, although in some use both ideas are connoted
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do not transplant a tree once it is established

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American sculptors . . . whose reputation was already establishedWharton

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the child initiates new processes of thought and establishes new mental habits much more easily than the adult— Eliot

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the novel as I have described it has never really established itself in America— Trilling

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at the end of the first growing season, the grass was firmly establishedFarmer's Weekly

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Analogous words: *implant: *fasten, attach, fix, affix: *prescribe, assign, define
Contrasted words: eradicate, deracinate, uproot (see EXTERMINATE): *abolish, annihilate, extinguish: displace, supplant, *replace
2 *coagulate, congeal, curdle, clot, jelly, jell
Analogous words: *harden, solidify: *compact, consolidate, concentrate
set n Set, circle, coterie, clique can all denote a more or less carefully selected or exclusive group of persons having a common interest.
Set applies to a comparatively large group, especially of society men and women bound together by common tastes
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a solid citizen of the fast and frantic international setKenneth Fearing

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I was myself living in several sets that had no connection with one another— Maugham

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her college set had stayed rigidly in a zigzag path . . . which they considered smart— Wouk

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Circle implies a common center of the group (as a person or a cause that draws persons to him or it) or a common interest, activity, or occupation
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the work of the younger writers . . . has even penetrated into academic circlesDay Lewis

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like sex, the word segregation was not mentioned in the best circlesLillian Smith

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she felt violently the gaps that death made in her circlePritchett

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an active figure in Madrid's literary and theatrical circles—Current Biog.

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Coterie stresses the notion of selectness or of congeniality within the small circle; clique heightens the implication of an often selfish or arrogant exclusiveness
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we three formed a little coterie within the household— Symonds

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the poetry of revolt is apt to become the poetry of a coterieLowes

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the best English society—mind, I don't call the London exclusive clique the best English society— Coleridge

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the corruption and debauchery of the homosexual cliqueShirer

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every hoodlum in every crack gang and clique who fancied himself with the blade— Mailer

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New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • set — set …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • Set — (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Set}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Setting}.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s[ a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root of E.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • set — /set/, v., set, setting, n., adj., interj. v.t. 1. to put (something or someone) in a particular place: to set a vase on a table. 2. to place in a particular position or posture: Set the baby on his feet. 3. to place in some relation to something …   Universalium

  • set — [ sɛt ] n. m. • 1893; mot anglais I ♦ Anglic. Manche d un match de tennis, de ping pong, de volley ball. Gagner le premier set. Partie de tennis en cinq sets. Balle de set, qui décide du gain du set. II ♦ Set ou set de table : ensemble des… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • set*/*/*/ — [set] (past tense and past participle set) verb I 1) [T] to put someone or something in a position, or to be in a particular place or position Tea s ready, he told them and set down the tray.[/ex] She set the baby on the floor to play.[/ex] 2)… …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • set — Ⅰ. set [1] ► VERB (setting; past and past part. set) 1) put, lay, or stand in a specified place or position. 2) put, bring, or place into a specified state. 3) cause or instruct (someone) to do something. 4) give someone (a task) …   English terms dictionary

  • set — [set] vt. set, setting [ME setten < OE settan (akin to Ger setzen & Goth satjan < Gmc * satjan), caus. formation “to cause to sit” < base of SIT] 1. to place in a sitting position; cause to sit; seat 2. a) to cause (a fowl) to sit on… …   English World dictionary

  • Set — (s[e^]t), v. i. 1. To pass below the horizon; to go down; to decline; to sink out of sight; to come to an end. [1913 Webster] Ere the weary sun set in the west. Shak. [1913 Webster] Thus this century sets with little mirth, and the next is likely …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Set — has 464 separate definitions in the Oxford English Dictionary, the most of any English word; its full definition comprises 10,000 words making it the longest definition in the OED. Set may refer to:In mathematics and science:*Set (mathematics), a …   Wikipedia

  • Set! — jeu de société Trouverez vous les 4 sets ? (solution en bas de page) {{{licence}}} Auteur Marsha Falco Éditeur …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Set — Set, n. 1. The act of setting, as of the sun or other heavenly body; descent; hence, the close; termination. Locking at the set of day. Tennyson. [1913 Webster] The weary sun hath made a golden set. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. That which is set,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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